The Amazing Endocrine System

The endocrine [hormone] system is the part of the body that regulates how we metabolize food, function sexually, repair tissue damage, and greatly influences our moods and energy levels. This is accomplished through a number of glands that produce various pro-hormones and hormones. Pro-hormones like pregnenolone, DHEA (see below), and progesterone are converted by the body into testosterone, estrogens, cortisol, cortisone, and other natural steroid hormones. These hormones are critical for good health. Many physical problems, such as obesity, high cholesterol, PMS, depression, lack of energy, and premature aging can be traced to hormonal irregularities.


DHEA, dehydroepiandrosterone, is known as the “mother hormone”. It is used by our bodies to produce at least 50 other hormones that are important to over-all health. Maintaining proper DHEA levels ensures energy, vitality, and the support of most functions involving our endocrine systems. It is produced by the adrenal glands in large amounts, and in the gonads and brain in lesser amounts.

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AIDS - A New Hope: Report from Africa
Endocrine System
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